Briefs

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION

The University of Greenwich                         SESSION 2010/11 Term  2

PDF: GAMSWEN11Brief


COURSE CODE*   HART 1007 + DESI 1109  

emigre magazine #63 spread 3
COURSE TITLE* Art and Design in Context 2
COURSE CO-ORDINATOR: Mark Ingham
ELEMENT/ITEM OF ASSESSMENT* WEIGHTING OF ELEMENT/ITEM WITHIN COURSE*  

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA ARE:

As published in this brief

As published in the main handout dated   September 2007

OTHER ELEMENTS WITHIN COURSE: Lectures/Gallery Visits and Magazine essay
TUTOR RESPONSIBLE FORTHIS ELEMENT/ITEM: Dr Mark Ingham/Professor Alan Powers
YEAR GROUP: Level1 GDD + Level 2 3DD
TUTORIAL GROUP/ATELIER GROUP/INTEREST GROUP:  BA/HND Graphic and Digital Design Level 1 + 3D Digital Design Level 2
TITLE FOR THIS BRIEF: GAMSWEN
ANY OTHER INFORMATION:  All work to be handed in on time.
DATE HANDED OUT: 12.01.2011PROJECT WORK  

Crit Dates: 23.02.2011

Assessment/Hand in: 10.05.2011

COURSEWORK

Hand-in Date: [Magazine/Newspaper/Blog] 10.05.2010 Mansion Site 4pm

In all cases: Please hand in with a course header sheet (bar coded)

*As per programme document and course charts.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: It is the responsibility of  each student to keep a copy of this hand-out in a file until September 2013.  If you are referred in the subject you will need this hand-out unless notified otherwise

Gamswen**2007………..2011

..COURSE TITLE: Art & Design in Context 2 HART 1007 + DESI 1109  

..TUTORS: Alan Powers and Mark Ingham

..WEDNESDAYS: 12.01.2011 – 16.02.2011 9.30 – 11.00..PLACE: Lecture Theatre H016 Honeycomb Building [Alan Powers] Then in the Library 11.30 – 1pm
 

Then Wednesdays 10am – 1pm 23.02.2011-04.05.2011 Lab B with Mark Ingham

At the end of this course you have to produce a ..BLOG NEWSPAPER or ..MAGAZINE that is a chronicle of the lectures and seminars that will be given by me and Alan Powers.
Each lecture, seminar or trip will have its own page or pages dedicated to it. As in a magazine or newspaper these will be your ..‘ARTICLES’ and will be fully illustrated and referenced*.
You will chose one of the lectures, seminars or trips to make into a ..‘FEATURE ARTICLE’ and will be an extended piece of writing of about 1,000 words and again it will be fully illustrated and referenced*.
The finished newspaper or magazine will be handed into the Architecture and Construction Office by 4pm on ..10th May 2011. It will be handed in with a Header Sheet.
The design, layout and size of the Magazine in entirely up to you. It may be a small ..PAMPHLET A5 size or a ..BROADSHEET A1 style newspaper. It may be Black and White, but colour will be encouraged. Your BLOG may use any format you think is appropriate.
You may want to use one of the ..STYLES discussed during the lecture series or a combination of styles, depending on what you want the publication to look like.
During each session you must take extensive notes, as a ..JOURNALIST would at a press conference, because this is what you will base your articles on. Each article must be at least ..300 words long.
Whenever you use a piece of information in your articles you ..MUST REFERENCE them by telling the readers where you got this information from, i.e. the author of a book, website, magazine etc.

COURSE TITLE: Art & Design in Context [2]

HART 1007 + DESI 1109

TUTORS: Alan Powers and Mark Ingham

WEDNESDAYS: 12.01.2011 – 16.02.2011 with Alan Powers    9.30 – 11.00

PLACE: Lecture Theatre H016

Honeycomb Building  Avery Hill Campus  Mansion Site

Then in the Library 11.30 – 1pm



Then….

Wednesdays: 23.02.2011 – 04.05.2010 with Mark Ingham

PLACE: Lab B   10am-1pm

At the end of this course you have to produce a BLOG NEWSPAPER or MAGAZINE that is a chronicle of the lectures and seminars that will be given by me and Alan Powers throughout the term. This will mean you will have to take notes on every lecture so you can then write it up for your publication.

Each lecture, seminar or trip will have its own page or pages dedicated to it. As in a magazine or newspaper these will be your ‘ARTICLES’ and will be fully illustrated and referenced*.

You will chose one of the lectures, seminars or trips to make into a ‘FEATURE ARTICLE’ and will be an extended piece of writing of about 1,000 words and again it will be fully ILLUSTRATED and referenced*.

The finished newspaper or magazine will be handed into the Architecture and Construction Office by 4pm on Friday 10th May 2010. It will be handed in with a Header Sheet.

The design, layout and size of the Magazine in entirely up to you. It may be a small PAMPHLET A5 size or a BROADSHEET A1 style newspaper. It may be Black and White, but a colour publication will be encouraged.

Your BLOG may use any format you think is appropriate.

You may want to use one of the STYLES discussed during the lecture series or a combination of styles, depending on what you want the publication to look like.

During each session you must take extensive notes, as a JOURNALIST would at a press conference, because this is what you will base your articles on. Each article must be at least 300 words long.

Whenever you use a piece of information in your articles you must REFERENCE them by telling the readers where you got this information from, i.e. the author of a book, website, magazine etc. You HAVE to use the HARVARD SYSTEM OF REFERENCING [see below].

Mark Ingham

January 2011

Assessment Criteria:

1. You have engaged with the course, demonstrating your motivation to explore ideas of personal relevance both in and out of college time and that you are able to plan your study effectively.

2. You have demonstrated an ability to communicate your ideas visually, verbally and in written form and interact with staff and students constructively.

3. You are able to refer to relevant practitioners and develop debates around your own work.

4. You can record and research information relevant to the project and have presented it in a coherent and professional manner in your learning journal and via written submissions.

5. You have begun to form imaginative strategies to develop your ideas in your work.

6. You are able to analyse and evaluate your own practice such that you have begun to achieve your intended outcome and make discriminating choices regarding the appropriateness of you direction, processes, making and writing skills.

Learning Outcomes:

  • On completing the course students will have:
  • Developed a  good working knowledge of the histories of art and design.
  • Gained knowledge of certain specialised aspects of design
  • An insight into social, political and global design issues
  • Developed initial skills in design literacy, critical analysis and argument

Useful Links:

http://gds.parkland.edu/gds/!lectures/what_is/whatis.html

http://gds.parkland.edu/gds/!lectures/history/0030_origins/origins.html

http://www.helveticafilm.com/vignellimap.html

http://www.nycsubway.org/img/maps/system_1972.jpg

http://gds.parkland.edu/gds/!lectures/history/1965/1984.html

Reading List:

Rick Poynor, [2003] No More Rules: Graphic Design and Postmodernism. Laurence king Publishing Ltd

Michael Bierut.[ed] [2006] Looking Closer Five: Critical Writings on Graphic Design. Allworth Press, New York

Richard Hollis, [2001] Graphic Design: A Concise History.

Thames and Hudson [World of Art], London

Daniel Chandler, [2002] Semiotics: The Basics. Routledge

Vincent Mosco [2005] Digital Sublime: Myth, Power and Cyberspace. MIT Press
Gordon Laing [2004] Digital Retro: The Evolution and Design of the Personal Computer. Ilex

Answer these Questions after each session

Name: ________________________________

Date: ______________

1. Name of graphic style (or topic) studied this session:

_____________________________________________________________

2. Describe specific qualities of this style that will help you identify it in the future, then sketch a typical example of this style on the back of this sheet of paper (or summarize important aspects of this topic).

_____________________________________________________________

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3. What is the most useful or meaningful thing you learned today?

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

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_____________________________________________________________

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_____________________________________________________________

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4. What question(s) remain upper-most in your mind after today’s lecture?

_____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

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Referencing

Leeds University has a very useful website where most ideas about referencing are explained. http://www.leeds.ac.uk/library/training/referencing/

Long list of way to cite work can also be found at The University of East London Website: http://www.uel.ac.uk/lss/Harvardreferencing.htm#q8

Keeping a record of your references

  • Keep a detailed record of the sources of information you use in your research as you consult them – it may be impossible to find them again later if you haven’t noted all the bibliographic details the first time
  • If you photocopy a journal article, make sure it shows the journal title, volume and issue numbers, and page numbers. If it doesn’t, write them on
  • Keep print-outs of any web pages you have consulted
  • If you’ve lost the details of one of your references, you won’t be able to use it in your assignment – using it without an acknowledgement would be plagiarism
  • One traditional method of storing your references is to write the details of each useful source you’ve consulted on a small card, which you can file in alphabetical order
  • Many people keep a list of the sources they’ve consulted in some electronic format such as a Word document, an Excel spreadsheet or a database such as Access

How to set out quotations and citations in your text

Introduction

When you quote from another source, you must ensure your writing reads fluently and that the quotation fits in its new context. Quotations should not simply be stuck in to prove you have read them. When you quote or paraphrase:

  • it must be relevant to your argument
  • it must join neatly with what comes before and after
  • it must make logical and grammatical sense
  • it should be no longer than is necessary

In-text citations give brief details of the source of an idea or piece of information within the text of an assignment. In the Harvard style, citations should contain only the following information, in this order:

  1. the surname of the author
  2. the date of publication of the text
  3. the page number(s) of the text (usually for direct quotations only).

A web page reference follows the pattern of:

Author(s). (Year of publication). Title of page in italic text [online]. [Date accessed]. Publisher of webpage if available. Available from World Wide Web: URL

This is an example of a web page reference:

STALEY, P. 2000. The ultimate referencing guide [online]. [Accessed 14 January 2002]. Brown’s Publishing House. Available from World Wide Web: http://web.address.htm

School of Architecture & Construction

STUDENT FEEDBACK                                                         SESSION 2009 – 10

COURSE TITLE: Art & Design in Context 2

COURSE CODE: HART 1007 DESI 1109

COURSE CO-ORDINATOR:                Mark Ingham

Dear Student,

Thank you for giving us some constructive feedback which

will help us change/improve the course.

Course Aims: (Write here as per approved Course Specification)

1.        Please state here which programme you are on:………………………………………………

2.        Write here what you think was GOOD about this course:

3.        Write here your thoughts on what COULD BE IMPROVED:

4.        Read the course aims stated above.

Do you think these aims have been achieved? Yes                  No

5.        If not, please say why here:

Please hand in this feedback sheet as directed by the course team or at the School Office.

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